Whale Shark, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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 HMCS Columbia

Canada, British Columbia

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Approximate

GPS History (1)

Latitude: 50° 7.935' N
Longitude: 125° 20.191' W

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 Access

English (Translate this text in English): Best access is by boat out of Campbell River. The wreck of the HMCS Columbia is in about 110 feet of water and marked by 3 buoys, one at its stern, which is the North end of the wreck, one amidship and one on the bow. Decend down the Northern buoy line to reach the stern.

English (Translate this text in English): Best access is by boat out of Campbell River. The wreck of the HMCS Columbia is in about 110 feet of water and marked by 3 buoys, one at its stern, which is the North end of the wreck, one amidship and one on the bow. Decend down the Northern buoy line to reach the stern.

Best access is by boat out of Campbell River. The wreck of the HMCS Columbia is in about 110 feet of water and marked by 3 buoys, one at its stern, which is the North end of the wreck, one amidship and one on the bow. Decend down the Northern buoy line to reach the stern.

English (Translate this text in English): Best access is by boat out of Campbell River. The wreck of the HMCS Columbia is in about 110 feet of water and marked by 3 buoys, one at its stern, which is the North end of the wreck, one amidship and one on the bow. Decend down the Northern buoy line to reach the stern.

English (Translate this text in English): Best access is by boat out of Campbell River. The wreck of the HMCS Columbia is in about 110 feet of water and marked by 3 buoys, one at its stern, which is the North end of the wreck, one amidship and one on the bow. Decend down the Northern buoy line to reach the stern.

English (Translate this text in English): Best access is by boat out of Campbell River. The wreck of the HMCS Columbia is in about 110 feet of water and marked by 3 buoys, one at its stern, which is the North end of the wreck, one amidship and one on the bow. Decend down the Northern buoy line to reach the stern.

English (Translate this text in English): Best access is by boat out of Campbell River. The wreck of the HMCS Columbia is in about 110 feet of water and marked by 3 buoys, one at its stern, which is the North end of the wreck, one amidship and one on the bow. Decend down the Northern buoy line to reach the stern.

English (Translate this text in English): Best access is by boat out of Campbell River. The wreck of the HMCS Columbia is in about 110 feet of water and marked by 3 buoys, one at its stern, which is the North end of the wreck, one amidship and one on the bow. Decend down the Northern buoy line to reach the stern.

English (Translate this text in English): Best access is by boat out of Campbell River. The wreck of the HMCS Columbia is in about 110 feet of water and marked by 3 buoys, one at its stern, which is the North end of the wreck, one amidship and one on the bow. Decend down the Northern buoy line to reach the stern.

How? By boat

Distance Good boat time (< 30min)

Easy to find? Easy to find

 Dive site Characteristics

Alternative name Wreck behind Maud Island

Average depth 30 m / 98.4 ft

Max depth 35 m / 114.8 ft

Current Low ( < 1 knot)

Visibility Good ( 10 - 30 m)

Quality

Dive site quality Good

Experience CMAS ** / AOW

Bio interest Interesting

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Wreck
- Deep
- Ambiance

Dive site activities

- Marine biology
- Night dive
- Dive training
- Photography

Dangers

- Depth
- Current

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): The HMCS Columbia was a destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1959-1974. She was removed from reserve status in 1988 and sunk as an artificial reef off Maud Island in British Columbia in 1996.

This is a good first time deep or wreck dive as the stern is shallow (70 - 80 feet or so dependant on tide) and the bow is 115 ft down to the muck. There are 3 bouys to tie up to and they are kept in good repair throughout the year.
There is lots of life on this wreck, large lingcod, octopus (look in the vent stacks near the open bridge)greenlings, rock cod, sea pens, anenomes of all sizes....... the list goes on.
Great for a night dive as it's in a sheltered area and if the visibility is good; the ship appearing out of the dark is a fantastic sight.
For more info on this wreck go to : http://www.artificialreef.bc.ca/
and check out the video in the gallery. This site also lists other artificial reefs in the Vancouver Island area.

English (Translate this text in English): The HMCS Columbia was a destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1959-1974. She was removed from reserve status in 1988 and sunk as an artificial reef off Maud Island in British Columbia in 1996.

This is a good first time deep or wreck dive as the stern is shallow (70 - 80 feet or so dependant on tide) and the bow is 115 ft down to the muck. There are 3 bouys to tie up to and they are kept in good repair throughout the year.
There is lots of life on this wreck, large lingcod, octopus (look in the vent stacks near the open bridge)greenlings, rock cod, sea pens, anenomes of all sizes....... the list goes on.
Great for a night dive as it's in a sheltered area and if the visibility is good; the ship appearing out of the dark is a fantastic sight.
For more info on this wreck go to : http://www.artificialreef.bc.ca/
and check out the video in the gallery. This site also lists other artificial reefs in the Vancouver Island area.

The HMCS Columbia was a destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1959-1974. She was removed from reserve status in 1988 and sunk as an artificial reef off Maud Island in British Columbia in 1996.

This is a good first time deep or wreck dive as the stern is shallow (70 - 80 feet or so dependant on tide) and the bow is 115 ft down to the muck. There are 3 bouys to tie up to and they are kept in good repair throughout the year.
There is lots of life on this wreck, large lingcod, octopus (look in the vent stacks near the open bridge)greenlings, rock cod, sea pens, anenomes of all sizes....... the list goes on.
Great for a night dive as it's in a sheltered area and if the visibility is good; the ship appearing out of the dark is a fantastic sight.
For more info on this wreck go to : http://www.artificialreef.bc.ca/
and check out the video in the gallery. This site also lists other artificial reefs in the Vancouver Island area.

English (Translate this text in English): The HMCS Columbia was a destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1959-1974. She was removed from reserve status in 1988 and sunk as an artificial reef off Maud Island in British Columbia in 1996.

This is a good first time deep or wreck dive as the stern is shallow (70 - 80 feet or so dependant on tide) and the bow is 115 ft down to the muck. There are 3 bouys to tie up to and they are kept in good repair throughout the year.
There is lots of life on this wreck, large lingcod, octopus (look in the vent stacks near the open bridge)greenlings, rock cod, sea pens, anenomes of all sizes....... the list goes on.
Great for a night dive as it's in a sheltered area and if the visibility is good; the ship appearing out of the dark is a fantastic sight.
For more info on this wreck go to : http://www.artificialreef.bc.ca/
and check out the video in the gallery. This site also lists other artificial reefs in the Vancouver Island area.

English (Translate this text in English): The HMCS Columbia was a destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1959-1974. She was removed from reserve status in 1988 and sunk as an artificial reef off Maud Island in British Columbia in 1996.

This is a good first time deep or wreck dive as the stern is shallow (70 - 80 feet or so dependant on tide) and the bow is 115 ft down to the muck. There are 3 bouys to tie up to and they are kept in good repair throughout the year.
There is lots of life on this wreck, large lingcod, octopus (look in the vent stacks near the open bridge)greenlings, rock cod, sea pens, anenomes of all sizes....... the list goes on.
Great for a night dive as it's in a sheltered area and if the visibility is good; the ship appearing out of the dark is a fantastic sight.
For more info on this wreck go to : http://www.artificialreef.bc.ca/
and check out the video in the gallery. This site also lists other artificial reefs in the Vancouver Island area.

English (Translate this text in English): The HMCS Columbia was a destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1959-1974. She was removed from reserve status in 1988 and sunk as an artificial reef off Maud Island in British Columbia in 1996.

This is a good first time deep or wreck dive as the stern is shallow (70 - 80 feet or so dependant on tide) and the bow is 115 ft down to the muck. There are 3 bouys to tie up to and they are kept in good repair throughout the year.
There is lots of life on this wreck, large lingcod, octopus (look in the vent stacks near the open bridge)greenlings, rock cod, sea pens, anenomes of all sizes....... the list goes on.
Great for a night dive as it's in a sheltered area and if the visibility is good; the ship appearing out of the dark is a fantastic sight.
For more info on this wreck go to : http://www.artificialreef.bc.ca/
and check out the video in the gallery. This site also lists other artificial reefs in the Vancouver Island area.

English (Translate this text in English): The HMCS Columbia was a destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1959-1974. She was removed from reserve status in 1988 and sunk as an artificial reef off Maud Island in British Columbia in 1996.

This is a good first time deep or wreck dive as the stern is shallow (70 - 80 feet or so dependant on tide) and the bow is 115 ft down to the muck. There are 3 bouys to tie up to and they are kept in good repair throughout the year.
There is lots of life on this wreck, large lingcod, octopus (look in the vent stacks near the open bridge)greenlings, rock cod, sea pens, anenomes of all sizes....... the list goes on.
Great for a night dive as it's in a sheltered area and if the visibility is good; the ship appearing out of the dark is a fantastic sight.
For more info on this wreck go to : http://www.artificialreef.bc.ca/
and check out the video in the gallery. This site also lists other artificial reefs in the Vancouver Island area.

English (Translate this text in English): The HMCS Columbia was a destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1959-1974. She was removed from reserve status in 1988 and sunk as an artificial reef off Maud Island in British Columbia in 1996.

This is a good first time deep or wreck dive as the stern is shallow (70 - 80 feet or so dependant on tide) and the bow is 115 ft down to the muck. There are 3 bouys to tie up to and they are kept in good repair throughout the year.
There is lots of life on this wreck, large lingcod, octopus (look in the vent stacks near the open bridge)greenlings, rock cod, sea pens, anenomes of all sizes....... the list goes on.
Great for a night dive as it's in a sheltered area and if the visibility is good; the ship appearing out of the dark is a fantastic sight.
For more info on this wreck go to : http://www.artificialreef.bc.ca/
and check out the video in the gallery. This site also lists other artificial reefs in the Vancouver Island area.

English (Translate this text in English): The HMCS Columbia was a destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1959-1974. She was removed from reserve status in 1988 and sunk as an artificial reef off Maud Island in British Columbia in 1996.

This is a good first time deep or wreck dive as the stern is shallow (70 - 80 feet or so dependant on tide) and the bow is 115 ft down to the muck. There are 3 bouys to tie up to and they are kept in good repair throughout the year.
There is lots of life on this wreck, large lingcod, octopus (look in the vent stacks near the open bridge)greenlings, rock cod, sea pens, anenomes of all sizes....... the list goes on.
Great for a night dive as it's in a sheltered area and if the visibility is good; the ship appearing out of the dark is a fantastic sight.
For more info on this wreck go to : http://www.artificialreef.bc.ca/
and check out the video in the gallery. This site also lists other artificial reefs in the Vancouver Island area.

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RaroDiver09 avatar
HMCS Columbia
Per RaroDiver09
mar 22, 2008
HMCS Columbia Destroyer -
Més...

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