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 Cedarville Wreck

USA, Michigan, Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Exact

GPS History (1)

Latitude: 45° 47.235' N
Longitude: 84° 40.248' W

User rating (1)


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 Access

English (Translate this text in English): The wreck is buoyed during the diving season by the Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve. Moorings are available at the bow, crack (near midship) and the stern of the wreck. Charters are available to the wreck out of St. Ignace

English (Translate this text in English): The wreck is buoyed during the diving season by the Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve. Moorings are available at the bow, crack (near midship) and the stern of the wreck. Charters are available to the wreck out of St. Ignace

The wreck is buoyed during the diving season by the Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve. Moorings are available at the bow, crack (near midship) and the stern of the wreck. Charters are available to the wreck out of St. Ignace

English (Translate this text in English): The wreck is buoyed during the diving season by the Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve. Moorings are available at the bow, crack (near midship) and the stern of the wreck. Charters are available to the wreck out of St. Ignace

English (Translate this text in English): The wreck is buoyed during the diving season by the Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve. Moorings are available at the bow, crack (near midship) and the stern of the wreck. Charters are available to the wreck out of St. Ignace

English (Translate this text in English): The wreck is buoyed during the diving season by the Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve. Moorings are available at the bow, crack (near midship) and the stern of the wreck. Charters are available to the wreck out of St. Ignace

English (Translate this text in English): The wreck is buoyed during the diving season by the Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve. Moorings are available at the bow, crack (near midship) and the stern of the wreck. Charters are available to the wreck out of St. Ignace

English (Translate this text in English): The wreck is buoyed during the diving season by the Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve. Moorings are available at the bow, crack (near midship) and the stern of the wreck. Charters are available to the wreck out of St. Ignace

English (Translate this text in English): The wreck is buoyed during the diving season by the Straits of Mackinac Shipwreck Preserve. Moorings are available at the bow, crack (near midship) and the stern of the wreck. Charters are available to the wreck out of St. Ignace

How? By boat

Distance Don't know

Easy to find? Hard to find

 Dive site Characteristics

Average depth 19.8 m / 65 ft

Max depth 35 m / 114.8 ft

Current None

Visibility Medium ( 5 - 10 m)

Quality

Dive site quality Good

Experience CMAS ** / AOW

Bio interest Interesting

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Fresh water
- Wreck
- Deep

Dive site activities

Dangers

- Depth

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): The Cedarville was built in 1927 in River Rouge MI. She was 588' with a triple expansion steam engine.

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville departed Calcite MI, near Rogers City, enroute to Gary, IN with 14,411 tons of limestone and a crew of 35. As they neared the Straits of Mackinac, a dense fog thickened. Due to a lack of communication, the Norwegian vessel Topdalsfjord collided with the Cedarville on her port side cutting a deep gash in her side between the seventh and eight hatch.

The Cedarville unsuccessfully tried to make it to Mackinaw City. At 10:25 am the Cedarville suddenly rolled over to starboard and sank in 105 feet of water about 3.5 Miles SE of the Mackinac Bridge. Twenty seven of the 35 men were rescued. All but one body was recovered.

The Cedarville is a favorite of divers in the Straits of Mackinac. She is usually moored at the bow (SE) and stern (NW), and occasionally at the gash. She is intact and lies on her starboard side, about 45 degrees from beige upside down. Her massive size and upside down orientation makes for an interesting, but sometimes confusing dive. The cabins are visible along with lots of deck equipment and the fatal gash. Caution is warranted given her size, depth, upside down orientation and variable visibility.

Present Condition
The Cedarville is in very good condition. While much of her ship stores and gear have been removed, she still has much to explore. Her cargo holds are very large, the pilothouse is easily accessible, the forward and stern crew quarters are intact, and her engine room is accessible. No penetration should be attempted without proper training. Hazards are present on the ship including open doors and hatchways, entangling line, confined spaces and heavy interior silt.

English (Translate this text in English): The Cedarville was built in 1927 in River Rouge MI. She was 588' with a triple expansion steam engine.

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville departed Calcite MI, near Rogers City, enroute to Gary, IN with 14,411 tons of limestone and a crew of 35. As they neared the Straits of Mackinac, a dense fog thickened. Due to a lack of communication, the Norwegian vessel Topdalsfjord collided with the Cedarville on her port side cutting a deep gash in her side between the seventh and eight hatch.

The Cedarville unsuccessfully tried to make it to Mackinaw City. At 10:25 am the Cedarville suddenly rolled over to starboard and sank in 105 feet of water about 3.5 Miles SE of the Mackinac Bridge. Twenty seven of the 35 men were rescued. All but one body was recovered.

The Cedarville is a favorite of divers in the Straits of Mackinac. She is usually moored at the bow (SE) and stern (NW), and occasionally at the gash. She is intact and lies on her starboard side, about 45 degrees from beige upside down. Her massive size and upside down orientation makes for an interesting, but sometimes confusing dive. The cabins are visible along with lots of deck equipment and the fatal gash. Caution is warranted given her size, depth, upside down orientation and variable visibility.

Present Condition
The Cedarville is in very good condition. While much of her ship stores and gear have been removed, she still has much to explore. Her cargo holds are very large, the pilothouse is easily accessible, the forward and stern crew quarters are intact, and her engine room is accessible. No penetration should be attempted without proper training. Hazards are present on the ship including open doors and hatchways, entangling line, confined spaces and heavy interior silt.

The Cedarville was built in 1927 in River Rouge MI. She was 588' with a triple expansion steam engine.

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville departed Calcite MI, near Rogers City, enroute to Gary, IN with 14,411 tons of limestone and a crew of 35. As they neared the Straits of Mackinac, a dense fog thickened. Due to a lack of communication, the Norwegian vessel Topdalsfjord collided with the Cedarville on her port side cutting a deep gash in her side between the seventh and eight hatch.

The Cedarville unsuccessfully tried to make it to Mackinaw City. At 10:25 am the Cedarville suddenly rolled over to starboard and sank in 105 feet of water about 3.5 Miles SE of the Mackinac Bridge. Twenty seven of the 35 men were rescued. All but one body was recovered.

The Cedarville is a favorite of divers in the Straits of Mackinac. She is usually moored at the bow (SE) and stern (NW), and occasionally at the gash. She is intact and lies on her starboard side, about 45 degrees from beige upside down. Her massive size and upside down orientation makes for an interesting, but sometimes confusing dive. The cabins are visible along with lots of deck equipment and the fatal gash. Caution is warranted given her size, depth, upside down orientation and variable visibility.

Present Condition
The Cedarville is in very good condition. While much of her ship stores and gear have been removed, she still has much to explore. Her cargo holds are very large, the pilothouse is easily accessible, the forward and stern crew quarters are intact, and her engine room is accessible. No penetration should be attempted without proper training. Hazards are present on the ship including open doors and hatchways, entangling line, confined spaces and heavy interior silt.

English (Translate this text in English): The Cedarville was built in 1927 in River Rouge MI. She was 588' with a triple expansion steam engine.

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville departed Calcite MI, near Rogers City, enroute to Gary, IN with 14,411 tons of limestone and a crew of 35. As they neared the Straits of Mackinac, a dense fog thickened. Due to a lack of communication, the Norwegian vessel Topdalsfjord collided with the Cedarville on her port side cutting a deep gash in her side between the seventh and eight hatch.

The Cedarville unsuccessfully tried to make it to Mackinaw City. At 10:25 am the Cedarville suddenly rolled over to starboard and sank in 105 feet of water about 3.5 Miles SE of the Mackinac Bridge. Twenty seven of the 35 men were rescued. All but one body was recovered.

The Cedarville is a favorite of divers in the Straits of Mackinac. She is usually moored at the bow (SE) and stern (NW), and occasionally at the gash. She is intact and lies on her starboard side, about 45 degrees from beige upside down. Her massive size and upside down orientation makes for an interesting, but sometimes confusing dive. The cabins are visible along with lots of deck equipment and the fatal gash. Caution is warranted given her size, depth, upside down orientation and variable visibility.

Present Condition
The Cedarville is in very good condition. While much of her ship stores and gear have been removed, she still has much to explore. Her cargo holds are very large, the pilothouse is easily accessible, the forward and stern crew quarters are intact, and her engine room is accessible. No penetration should be attempted without proper training. Hazards are present on the ship including open doors and hatchways, entangling line, confined spaces and heavy interior silt.

English (Translate this text in English): The Cedarville was built in 1927 in River Rouge MI. She was 588' with a triple expansion steam engine.

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville departed Calcite MI, near Rogers City, enroute to Gary, IN with 14,411 tons of limestone and a crew of 35. As they neared the Straits of Mackinac, a dense fog thickened. Due to a lack of communication, the Norwegian vessel Topdalsfjord collided with the Cedarville on her port side cutting a deep gash in her side between the seventh and eight hatch.

The Cedarville unsuccessfully tried to make it to Mackinaw City. At 10:25 am the Cedarville suddenly rolled over to starboard and sank in 105 feet of water about 3.5 Miles SE of the Mackinac Bridge. Twenty seven of the 35 men were rescued. All but one body was recovered.

The Cedarville is a favorite of divers in the Straits of Mackinac. She is usually moored at the bow (SE) and stern (NW), and occasionally at the gash. She is intact and lies on her starboard side, about 45 degrees from beige upside down. Her massive size and upside down orientation makes for an interesting, but sometimes confusing dive. The cabins are visible along with lots of deck equipment and the fatal gash. Caution is warranted given her size, depth, upside down orientation and variable visibility.

Present Condition
The Cedarville is in very good condition. While much of her ship stores and gear have been removed, she still has much to explore. Her cargo holds are very large, the pilothouse is easily accessible, the forward and stern crew quarters are intact, and her engine room is accessible. No penetration should be attempted without proper training. Hazards are present on the ship including open doors and hatchways, entangling line, confined spaces and heavy interior silt.

English (Translate this text in English): The Cedarville was built in 1927 in River Rouge MI. She was 588' with a triple expansion steam engine.

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville departed Calcite MI, near Rogers City, enroute to Gary, IN with 14,411 tons of limestone and a crew of 35. As they neared the Straits of Mackinac, a dense fog thickened. Due to a lack of communication, the Norwegian vessel Topdalsfjord collided with the Cedarville on her port side cutting a deep gash in her side between the seventh and eight hatch.

The Cedarville unsuccessfully tried to make it to Mackinaw City. At 10:25 am the Cedarville suddenly rolled over to starboard and sank in 105 feet of water about 3.5 Miles SE of the Mackinac Bridge. Twenty seven of the 35 men were rescued. All but one body was recovered.

The Cedarville is a favorite of divers in the Straits of Mackinac. She is usually moored at the bow (SE) and stern (NW), and occasionally at the gash. She is intact and lies on her starboard side, about 45 degrees from beige upside down. Her massive size and upside down orientation makes for an interesting, but sometimes confusing dive. The cabins are visible along with lots of deck equipment and the fatal gash. Caution is warranted given her size, depth, upside down orientation and variable visibility.

Present Condition
The Cedarville is in very good condition. While much of her ship stores and gear have been removed, she still has much to explore. Her cargo holds are very large, the pilothouse is easily accessible, the forward and stern crew quarters are intact, and her engine room is accessible. No penetration should be attempted without proper training. Hazards are present on the ship including open doors and hatchways, entangling line, confined spaces and heavy interior silt.

English (Translate this text in English): The Cedarville was built in 1927 in River Rouge MI. She was 588' with a triple expansion steam engine.

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville departed Calcite MI, near Rogers City, enroute to Gary, IN with 14,411 tons of limestone and a crew of 35. As they neared the Straits of Mackinac, a dense fog thickened. Due to a lack of communication, the Norwegian vessel Topdalsfjord collided with the Cedarville on her port side cutting a deep gash in her side between the seventh and eight hatch.

The Cedarville unsuccessfully tried to make it to Mackinaw City. At 10:25 am the Cedarville suddenly rolled over to starboard and sank in 105 feet of water about 3.5 Miles SE of the Mackinac Bridge. Twenty seven of the 35 men were rescued. All but one body was recovered.

The Cedarville is a favorite of divers in the Straits of Mackinac. She is usually moored at the bow (SE) and stern (NW), and occasionally at the gash. She is intact and lies on her starboard side, about 45 degrees from beige upside down. Her massive size and upside down orientation makes for an interesting, but sometimes confusing dive. The cabins are visible along with lots of deck equipment and the fatal gash. Caution is warranted given her size, depth, upside down orientation and variable visibility.

Present Condition
The Cedarville is in very good condition. While much of her ship stores and gear have been removed, she still has much to explore. Her cargo holds are very large, the pilothouse is easily accessible, the forward and stern crew quarters are intact, and her engine room is accessible. No penetration should be attempted without proper training. Hazards are present on the ship including open doors and hatchways, entangling line, confined spaces and heavy interior silt.

English (Translate this text in English): The Cedarville was built in 1927 in River Rouge MI. She was 588' with a triple expansion steam engine.

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville departed Calcite MI, near Rogers City, enroute to Gary, IN with 14,411 tons of limestone and a crew of 35. As they neared the Straits of Mackinac, a dense fog thickened. Due to a lack of communication, the Norwegian vessel Topdalsfjord collided with the Cedarville on her port side cutting a deep gash in her side between the seventh and eight hatch.

The Cedarville unsuccessfully tried to make it to Mackinaw City. At 10:25 am the Cedarville suddenly rolled over to starboard and sank in 105 feet of water about 3.5 Miles SE of the Mackinac Bridge. Twenty seven of the 35 men were rescued. All but one body was recovered.

The Cedarville is a favorite of divers in the Straits of Mackinac. She is usually moored at the bow (SE) and stern (NW), and occasionally at the gash. She is intact and lies on her starboard side, about 45 degrees from beige upside down. Her massive size and upside down orientation makes for an interesting, but sometimes confusing dive. The cabins are visible along with lots of deck equipment and the fatal gash. Caution is warranted given her size, depth, upside down orientation and variable visibility.

Present Condition
The Cedarville is in very good condition. While much of her ship stores and gear have been removed, she still has much to explore. Her cargo holds are very large, the pilothouse is easily accessible, the forward and stern crew quarters are intact, and her engine room is accessible. No penetration should be attempted without proper training. Hazards are present on the ship including open doors and hatchways, entangling line, confined spaces and heavy interior silt.

English (Translate this text in English): The Cedarville was built in 1927 in River Rouge MI. She was 588' with a triple expansion steam engine.

On May 7, 1965, the Cedarville departed Calcite MI, near Rogers City, enroute to Gary, IN with 14,411 tons of limestone and a crew of 35. As they neared the Straits of Mackinac, a dense fog thickened. Due to a lack of communication, the Norwegian vessel Topdalsfjord collided with the Cedarville on her port side cutting a deep gash in her side between the seventh and eight hatch.

The Cedarville unsuccessfully tried to make it to Mackinaw City. At 10:25 am the Cedarville suddenly rolled over to starboard and sank in 105 feet of water about 3.5 Miles SE of the Mackinac Bridge. Twenty seven of the 35 men were rescued. All but one body was recovered.

The Cedarville is a favorite of divers in the Straits of Mackinac. She is usually moored at the bow (SE) and stern (NW), and occasionally at the gash. She is intact and lies on her starboard side, about 45 degrees from beige upside down. Her massive size and upside down orientation makes for an interesting, but sometimes confusing dive. The cabins are visible along with lots of deck equipment and the fatal gash. Caution is warranted given her size, depth, upside down orientation and variable visibility.

Present Condition
The Cedarville is in very good condition. While much of her ship stores and gear have been removed, she still has much to explore. Her cargo holds are very large, the pilothouse is easily accessible, the forward and stern crew quarters are intact, and her engine room is accessible. No penetration should be attempted without proper training. Hazards are present on the ship including open doors and hatchways, entangling line, confined spaces and heavy interior silt.

 Photos

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Cedarville Wreck
United States of America

Cedarville Wreck
United States of America

Cedarville Wreck
United States of America

Cedarville Wreck
United States of America

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