Clownfish, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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 HMS Proselyte

St Martin

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Approximate

GPS History (1)

Latitude: 17° 59.344' N
Longitude: 63° 3.543' W

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 Access

English (Translate this text in English): South of Great bay. The site is equipped with mooring buoys. This dive site is part of the St Maarten Marine Park. You need to have a valid dive tag to be diving on this site. (see www.naturefoundationsxm.org)

English (Translate this text in English): South of Great bay. The site is equipped with mooring buoys. This dive site is part of the St Maarten Marine Park. You need to have a valid dive tag to be diving on this site. (see www.naturefoundationsxm.org)

South of Great bay. The site is equipped with mooring buoys. This dive site is part of the St Maarten Marine Park. You need to have a valid dive tag to be diving on this site. (see www.naturefoundationsxm.org)

English (Translate this text in English): South of Great bay. The site is equipped with mooring buoys. This dive site is part of the St Maarten Marine Park. You need to have a valid dive tag to be diving on this site. (see www.naturefoundationsxm.org)

English (Translate this text in English): South of Great bay. The site is equipped with mooring buoys. This dive site is part of the St Maarten Marine Park. You need to have a valid dive tag to be diving on this site. (see www.naturefoundationsxm.org)

English (Translate this text in English): South of Great bay. The site is equipped with mooring buoys. This dive site is part of the St Maarten Marine Park. You need to have a valid dive tag to be diving on this site. (see www.naturefoundationsxm.org)

English (Translate this text in English): South of Great bay. The site is equipped with mooring buoys. This dive site is part of the St Maarten Marine Park. You need to have a valid dive tag to be diving on this site. (see www.naturefoundationsxm.org)

English (Translate this text in English): South of Great bay. The site is equipped with mooring buoys. This dive site is part of the St Maarten Marine Park. You need to have a valid dive tag to be diving on this site. (see www.naturefoundationsxm.org)

English (Translate this text in English): South of Great bay. The site is equipped with mooring buoys. This dive site is part of the St Maarten Marine Park. You need to have a valid dive tag to be diving on this site. (see www.naturefoundationsxm.org)

How? By boat

Distance Short boat time (< 10min)

Easy to find? Easy to find

 Dive site Characteristics

Alternative name Jason

Average depth 6.1 m / 20 ft

Max depth 13.7 m / 44.9 ft

Current None

Visibility Good ( 10 - 30 m)

Quality

Dive site quality Great

Experience All divers

Bio interest Interesting

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Wreck
- Sharks
- Reef

Dive site activities

- Photography

Dangers

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): Dutch frigate, originally named the Jason, launched in 1770. In 1796, the crew mutinied and handed the ship over to the British, who renamed the ship HMS Proselyte. In September of 1801, on a trip from St Kitts to St Martin, the ship struck the Man O War Shoals and sank. All of the crew were rescued, however.

You can still see a couple of large anchors, some cannons and other heavily encrusted objects on the sea floor, right below the current mooring. Plenty of wildlife in around the reef. If you're lucky you may even encounter one or two Caribbean Reef sharks prowling the canyons.

English (Translate this text in English): Dutch frigate, originally named the Jason, launched in 1770. In 1796, the crew mutinied and handed the ship over to the British, who renamed the ship HMS Proselyte. In September of 1801, on a trip from St Kitts to St Martin, the ship struck the Man O War Shoals and sank. All of the crew were rescued, however.

You can still see a couple of large anchors, some cannons and other heavily encrusted objects on the sea floor, right below the current mooring. Plenty of wildlife in around the reef. If you're lucky you may even encounter one or two Caribbean Reef sharks prowling the canyons.

Dutch frigate, originally named the Jason, launched in 1770. In 1796, the crew mutinied and handed the ship over to the British, who renamed the ship HMS Proselyte. In September of 1801, on a trip from St Kitts to St Martin, the ship struck the Man O War Shoals and sank. All of the crew were rescued, however.

You can still see a couple of large anchors, some cannons and other heavily encrusted objects on the sea floor, right below the current mooring. Plenty of wildlife in around the reef. If you're lucky you may even encounter one or two Caribbean Reef sharks prowling the canyons.

English (Translate this text in English): Dutch frigate, originally named the Jason, launched in 1770. In 1796, the crew mutinied and handed the ship over to the British, who renamed the ship HMS Proselyte. In September of 1801, on a trip from St Kitts to St Martin, the ship struck the Man O War Shoals and sank. All of the crew were rescued, however.

You can still see a couple of large anchors, some cannons and other heavily encrusted objects on the sea floor, right below the current mooring. Plenty of wildlife in around the reef. If you're lucky you may even encounter one or two Caribbean Reef sharks prowling the canyons.

English (Translate this text in English): Dutch frigate, originally named the Jason, launched in 1770. In 1796, the crew mutinied and handed the ship over to the British, who renamed the ship HMS Proselyte. In September of 1801, on a trip from St Kitts to St Martin, the ship struck the Man O War Shoals and sank. All of the crew were rescued, however.

You can still see a couple of large anchors, some cannons and other heavily encrusted objects on the sea floor, right below the current mooring. Plenty of wildlife in around the reef. If you're lucky you may even encounter one or two Caribbean Reef sharks prowling the canyons.

English (Translate this text in English): Dutch frigate, originally named the Jason, launched in 1770. In 1796, the crew mutinied and handed the ship over to the British, who renamed the ship HMS Proselyte. In September of 1801, on a trip from St Kitts to St Martin, the ship struck the Man O War Shoals and sank. All of the crew were rescued, however.

You can still see a couple of large anchors, some cannons and other heavily encrusted objects on the sea floor, right below the current mooring. Plenty of wildlife in around the reef. If you're lucky you may even encounter one or two Caribbean Reef sharks prowling the canyons.

English (Translate this text in English): Dutch frigate, originally named the Jason, launched in 1770. In 1796, the crew mutinied and handed the ship over to the British, who renamed the ship HMS Proselyte. In September of 1801, on a trip from St Kitts to St Martin, the ship struck the Man O War Shoals and sank. All of the crew were rescued, however.

You can still see a couple of large anchors, some cannons and other heavily encrusted objects on the sea floor, right below the current mooring. Plenty of wildlife in around the reef. If you're lucky you may even encounter one or two Caribbean Reef sharks prowling the canyons.

English (Translate this text in English): Dutch frigate, originally named the Jason, launched in 1770. In 1796, the crew mutinied and handed the ship over to the British, who renamed the ship HMS Proselyte. In September of 1801, on a trip from St Kitts to St Martin, the ship struck the Man O War Shoals and sank. All of the crew were rescued, however.

You can still see a couple of large anchors, some cannons and other heavily encrusted objects on the sea floor, right below the current mooring. Plenty of wildlife in around the reef. If you're lucky you may even encounter one or two Caribbean Reef sharks prowling the canyons.

English (Translate this text in English): Dutch frigate, originally named the Jason, launched in 1770. In 1796, the crew mutinied and handed the ship over to the British, who renamed the ship HMS Proselyte. In September of 1801, on a trip from St Kitts to St Martin, the ship struck the Man O War Shoals and sank. All of the crew were rescued, however.

You can still see a couple of large anchors, some cannons and other heavily encrusted objects on the sea floor, right below the current mooring. Plenty of wildlife in around the reef. If you're lucky you may even encounter one or two Caribbean Reef sharks prowling the canyons.

 Photos

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HMS Proselyte
Saint Martin

HMS Proselyte
Saint Martin

HMS Proselyte
Saint Martin

HMS Proselyte
Saint Martin

 Videos

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 Dive logs

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curtdennis avatar
HMS Proselyte
Obok curtdennis
mar 20, 2019
St. Martens Dive #2 -
Więcej...
ccnicholls99 avatar
HMS Proselyte
Obok ccnicholls99
sie 19, 2016
- Spotted 3 Caribbean Reef Sharks, loads of Fr. Grunt. Nice Spiny Lobster running across the sand between rock outcroppings.
Więcej...

HMS Proselyte
Obok atiffee
lis 30, 1999
- first dive with Arden, had a blast, huge Green Sea Turtles, lobster, blue tang, parrotfish, stone fish;  this was an old dutch gunboat that broke apart on the reef in the late 1700s, the wood ship was all decayed, but the enormous cannons
Więcej...

 Dive trips

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curtdennis avatar
Trip: St. Martens
By curtdennis
From Mar 20, 2019 to Mar 20, 2019

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